Another Reason of DRM Stupidity

Another day, another story makes the news on why Digital Rights Management (DRM) is bad. The Consumerist reports of B&N denying access to a purchased e-book because the purchaser’s credit card has expired:

Yesterday, I tried to download an ebook I paid for, and previously put on my Nook, a few months ago. When I tried, I got an error message stating I could not download the book because the credit card on file had expired. But, I already paid for it. Who cares if the credit card is expired? It has long since been paid for, so the status of the card on file has nothing to do with my ability to download said book. I didn’t see anything in the terms of service about this either, but it’s possible I missed it.

There’s a good discussion of this DRM stupidity at TechDirt.

From earlier this year, you might want to check out this Lifehacker article explaining how to strip DRM from your ebooks.

The Worst of DRM

This blog post offers a cautionary story on how Amazon can wipe out your entire account:

As a long-term writer about technology, DRM, privacy and user rights, this Amazon example shows the very worst of DRM. If the retailer, in this case Amazon, thinks you’re a crook, they will throw you out and take away everything that you bought. And if you disagree, you’re totally outlawed. Not only is your account closed, all your books that you paid for are gone. With DRM, you don’t buy and own books, you merely rent them for as long as the retailer finds it convenient.

One reason I still prefer to own physical books versus e-books.