The Secrets of Snow-Diving Foxes

This is a super interesting article by NPR’s Robert Krulwich, who summarizes research on why snow foxes jump the way they do in hunting for prey:

When they looked at each other’s notes, the researchers saw a pattern: For some reason, Czech foxes prefer to jump in a particular direction — toward the northeast. (To be more precise, it’s about 20 degrees off “magnetic north” — the “N” on your compass.) As the video above says, most of the time, most foxes miss their targets and emerge covered in snow and (one presumes) a little embarrassed. But when they pointed in that particular northeasterly direction, Ed writes, “they killed on 73 percent of their attacks.” If they reversed direction, and jumped exactly the opposite way, they killed 60 percent of the time. But in all other directions — east, south, west, whatever — they sucked. Only 18 percent of those jumps were successful.

Here’s a video of a hunting fox in action: