On the 30 Year Anniversary of the Chernobyl Disaster

Today marks the 30th anniversary since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion on April 26, 1986 in Ukraine.

Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve watched a few documentaries that do an excellent job summarizing how the disaster unfolded, the impact the disaster has had on the population of Ukraine and Belarus (as well as other world regions impacted by the nuclear fallout), and the still-ongoing efforts to contain the spread of the radioactivity.

The three documentaries I recommend are below. First, The Battle of Chernobyl (incorrectly titled as “Chernobyl Uncensored” in one YouTube video) is a 2006 documentary (approximately one and a half hours in length) that stars Mikhail Gorbachev, former president of the U.S.S.R., providing excellent commentary throughout:

Second, the documentary Zero Hour creates a minute-by-minute breakdown of the accident at Reactor #4 at Chernobyl (from about an hour before the accident to approximately 48 hours after the accident):

 

Finally, the documentary Chernobyl 3828 is perhaps the most poignant of the documentaries, profiling the 3828 human workers (who came to be known as liquidators or “bio-robots”) that were sent into the most radioactive zone—the roof of the reactor #4—in September 1986 to finish cleaning up the radioactive waste before the sarcophagus over the reactor could be built. There was such high levels of radioactivity in this area that robots sent from Western Europe had their electronics fried in less than 48 hours. The clean-up effort, nevertheless, had to go on—and these bio-robots would sacrifice themselves for the greater cause. These workers received the most lethal doses of the radiation (background radiation of ~8,000 Roentgens), and what is agonizing to watch is the struggle the commander of the operation has to face, knowing that he is ultimately sending these men to their early deaths. The narrator of the documentary, Valeriy Starodumov, worked as a dosimeter scout at the Chernobyl clean-up site; in the documentary, he trains and takes the soldiers to the zone of the highest contamination. And so, a conveyor of bio-robots begins, and Starodumov narrates:

I will take a few hundred people through the zone. I will not know who they are, I will not see their faces behind protective masks and I will never know what is going to happen to them afterwards. It was not me who had made a decision to send these men to the zones of mortal danger, but each night some inexplicable feeling of guilt brings me back to the past. To that first two-minute shift, which has been continues for me for a quarter of century…

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s